Category: Natural Talents

What Would Your Life Be Like If Your Job Expressed Your Talents, Passions and Personality?

I thought, “Maybe it’s time for a career change”. My first career seemed like a good idea at the time but, looking back, it wasn’t. After years of suffering I realized that, if I wanted work that fit me like a glove, I needed to dig in and make choosing my future work into a project: a career design project. I became a career detective, looking for clues about how I best connected with the world. Instead of looking for fingerprints and DNA, I need different clues:

Natural talents Everyone is born with a unique group of talents that are as individual as a fingerprint or snowflake. These talents give each person a special ability to do certain kinds of tasks easily and happily, yet also make other tasks seem like pure torture. Can you imagine your favorite comedian as an accountant? Talents are completely different from acquired knowledge, skills, and interests. Your interests can change. You can gain new skills and knowledge. Your natural, inherited talents remain with you for your entire life. They are the hand you have been dealt by Mother Nature. You can’t change them. You can, however, learn to play the hand you have been dealt brilliantly and to your best advantage.

Personality traits and temperament Are you engaged in work that make it necessary to suppress your true nature. An elegant fit between you and your work includes and supports the full self-expression of your personality. Telltale signs of a career that doesn’t fit your personality include: the necessity to assume a different personality at work, restricted self-expression, activities that conflict with your values.

Passions, meaning, mission, purpose People who are enthusiastic about their work are usually engaged in something they care about and are proud of what they do. They feel they are making a contribution. They may need to work to pay the bills, but that is not what gets them out of bed in the morning.

Fulfills your goals Having something to shoot for is an important part of the joy of working. A custom-designed career supports you to fulfill your personal and family goals and gives you a sense of challenge on the job.

Rewards fit your values Like a biscuit you give a dog, rewards are the motivators that help keep you happily performing your tricks at work. Some rewards mean more to you than others. That is because they are linked with your values. Values and rewards are the opposite sides of the same coin.

Compatible work environments Each person flourishes in some work environments and finds others stressful or otherwise inappropriate. If living a full life outside of work is important, don’t succumb to

Go for vitality, not comfort. Be unreasonable. At every moment you have one essential choice: to let the programming steer the boat or to take the helm yourself. Your present circumstances, your mood, the thoughts that pass by all have a life of their own, independent of your will. You can, at any moment, take flight on new wings into an unprecedented life by making a choice for vitality, for designing a future, a life you will love.

How to Choose the Best College Major

You hear it everywhere: “A college degree is more important than ever.” Everyone knows that college graduates earn more than those who just made it through high school. After World War II, the American job market grew along with the economy, and so did the advantages of a college education. The cost of college was a great investment. Now that is no longer necessarily true.

A few years ago, research firm PayScale calculated that a college degree produced about a 7% return on investment, about the same long-term return as the stock market. A survey they conducted in 2012 for Businessweek showed that graduating from some elite colleges produced a return of more than 10%. However graduating from many colleges produced a negative return. In his new book, “Will College Pay Off?”, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli writes, “The big news about the payoff from college should be the incredible variation in it across colleges.” “Looking at the actual return on the costs of attending college, careful analysis suggest that the payoff from many college programs–as much as one in four-is actually negative.”

Since the mid-90s, the experts have claimed that liberal arts degrees were a waste of time and money. You needed to major in a STEM specialty (science, technology, engineering, or mathematics) to get ahead. But now the equation has changed. Cappelli calculates that only about one fifth of recent STEM graduates will get a job in their field of study.

Given all this, what can you do to have an exceptional career?

  1. Keep your options open until you can make a clear, informed choice.
  2. Make a choice that fits your talents, personality and values. This is the best guarantee of success and that you will love your work (and your life). After all, this is probably the only life you have. Don’t waste it.
  3. Pick a career that will provide intrinsic (inner) satisfaction as well as extrinsic (external rewards). Many years ago, when I regularly visited friends studying at Harvard, I was amazed how broad and deep their passions and interests ran. They sought a wide range of careers. Now I hear that the most Harvard undergraduates hope to become investment bankers. I’m sure that’s an exaggeration, but still, many are making life choices that will not necessarily lead to fulfillment. Or, as Steve Jobs said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do”.
  4. If you are going to go to college, plan on a graduate degree for most specialties. In 1960 only about 10% of Americans had a college degree. Now seventy percent of high school graduates go to college. You may need a 4-year degree just to get a job that once required only a high school degree.
  5. Private educational loans have enslaved hundreds of thousands of young people in perpetual debt. If you doubt this, just talk with a few twenty-five-year-olds. Don’t help elect anyone who does not take a strong stand for education finance reform. Public education should be free, the same as it is in most advanced European countries. 
  6. Major technology companies have added to their focus of competing for top engineers and technicians. They are now competing for talented people to lead and manage. They want smart young people with business and liberal arts degrees. The long-maligned liberal arts degree is making a comeback.
  7. Once again, the bottom-line is: pick a career direction where you will be exceptional.

 Some of this blog entry is rewritten from a great article by John Cassidy in the September 7, 2015 issue of The New Yorker. Get it. Read it. It is powerful and important.

The Pleasure of Doing What You Do Best

We don’t even have a word for it. According to urbandictionary.com, the German word functionslust means: Pleasure taken in doing what one does best. Birds flying, dogs running, dolphins swimming. And you in a job that uses your best talents all day.

  • Does your ideal job focus more on people, data or things?
  • What kind of problems light you up?
  • What work can you do for hours and not get bored or burned out?
  • Are you best concentrating or flowing?
  • An unique expert or part of a team?
  • Outgoing or internal focus?

What gives you the most functionslust?

THINKING ABOUT A CAREER CHANGE? Here’s what to do; and how expert career coaching and counseling can help.

If you’re like most people considering a career change, you’re probably thinking about various potential jobs . That seldom works. Since you want work that fits you, start with YOU rather than exploring careers. Here are a few things to consider:

Natural talents and innate abilities Everyone is born with a unique group of talents that are as individual as a fingerprint or snowflake. These talents give each person a special ability to do certain kinds of tasks easily and happily, yet also make other tasks seem like pure torture. Can you imagine your favorite improvisational comedian as an accountant? Talents are completely different from acquired knowledge, skills, and interests. Your interests can change. You can gain new skills and knowledge. Your natural, inherited talents remain with you for your entire life. They are the hand you have been dealt by Mother Nature. You can’t change them. You can, however, play the hand you have been dealt brilliantly and to your best advantage. Your new direction will fit best if it combines your talents and personality perfectly, and requires very little time spent in activities that do not make best use of your strengths.

Personality traits and temperament Many people are engaged in careers that make it necessary to suppress themselves at the job. An elegant fit between you and your work includes and supports the full self-expression of your personality. Telltale signs of a career that doesn’t fit your personality include: the necessity to assume a different personality at work, restricted self-expression, activities that conflict with your values.

Passions, meaning, mission, purpose  People who are enthusiastic about their work are usually engaged in something they care about and are proud of what they do. They feel they are making a contribution. They may need to go to work to pay the bills, but that is not what gets them out of bed in the morning.

Willingness to stretch your boundaries Stretch as far as possible toward a career choice that will not be a compromise. At the same time, be completely realistic. It makes no sense to make plans you are unwilling or unable to achieve.

Fulfills your goals Having something big to shoot for is an important part of the joy of working. A custom-designed career supports you to fulfill your personal and family goals and gives you a sense of challenge on the job.

Rewards fit your values Like a biscuit you give a dog, rewards are the motivators that help keep you happily performing your tricks at work. Some rewards mean more to you than others. That is because they are linked with your values.

Compatible work environments Each person flourishes in some work environments and finds others stressful or otherwise inappropriate. Several different aspects of the environment that surrounds you play a vital role in the quality of your work life. You live in a certain geographical environment. The company you work for has a particular organizational environment, style, and corporate personality that affects you every minute you are there. On a smaller scale, your immediate work environment includes the physical work setting, the tone or mood of your office, and your relationships with others, including your supervisor, fellow employees, and clients or customers.

The bottom line Are the careers you are considering really suitable, doable, and available? Do they really fit you? The decisions you make about your career direction are no more than pipe dreams unless they are achievable and actually turn out as you hope they will. Research is the key to understanding the reality of potential future careers.

How expert career coaching can help: Most of what we know about ourselves.is based on past experiences. If you just reorganize these experiences and points-of-view into a new job, your future is likely to look pretty much the same as the past. It is often what we haven’t considered; the things we don’t know that we don’t know, that provide the most powerful insights that support the best choices. It takes looking from new perspectives to reach the best decisions that will lead to the most fulfilling future. And who better to help with that than an expert coach – counselor – adviser – guide?